Angkor visit - 2 days

Package from 9720 THB

Platinum - with guide

Visit the main temples of Angkor Park

Visit the main temples of Angkor Park

Day 1 - Visit the Angkor site: Ta Prohm - Bayon - Angkor Wat

 Siem Reap 

The tour. English guide and driver will pick you up at your hotel and then take you to visit the most beautiful sites of the World Heritage. The starting point will be the Ta Prohm temple; it is a temple where tree roots have invaded the roofs and walls of the temple. Ta Prohm is one of the most atmospheric temples of Angkor. The Hollywood blockbuster 'Tomb Raider' (with Angelina Jolie) has made the temple famous. Once you have covered the site, you will be surprised by the unique atmosphere created by these temples half covered with trees and vegetation.
Then you will continue with the visit of the Bayon temple which is located in the middle of the great ancient city of Angkor Thom, the last capital of the Khmer Empire during the reign of King Jayavarman VII. It is a city surrounded by an 8 meters high rampart with 3 km on each side, drawing a perfect square. Bayon, King Jayavarman VII’s State Temple dated 1181, is one of the most mysterious temples in the Angkor region. You will admire its beautifully carved central towers that cover 200 huge stone Buddha faces facing the four cardinal points. Leaving the Bayon, you will visit the terrace of the Elephants. Then you will visit the temple of Baphoun, which was one of the biggest temples of the site of Angkor. Built as a pyramid in the 11th century, Baphuon's main attraction is the reclining giant Buddha (60m long) that can be discovered on the south side. Right next to the temple, you will discover the Phimeanakas, which is inside of what was the Royal Palace. The temple of Phimeanakas (literally "heavenly palace"), built in the tenth century, would have been covered with a golden roof. In the afternoon, you will have a break for lunch
Visit the largest and most impressive temple of all the sites of Angkor: the temple of Angkor Wat, the largest sacred building in the world. This great temple, built by King Suryavarman II in the early 12th century, took 37 years of work dedicated to the Hindu god Vishnu, symbol of the apogee of the Khmer civilization. The complex covers nearly 210 hectares, and unveils to visitors all the majesty and beauty of its impressive architecture. You will visit the epic scenes on the walls of the temple with our English speaking guide. The 5 towers of Angkor Wat are now on the flag of Cambodia. Return to the hotel late afternoon, overnight in Siem Reap.


Ta Prohm

Ta Prohm temple; it is a temple where tree roots have invaded the roofs and walls of the temple. Ta Prohm is one of the most atmospheric temples of Angkor. The Hollywood blockbuster 'Tomb Raider' (with Angelina Jolie) has made the temple famous. Once you have covered the site, you will be surprised by the unique atmosphere created by these temples half covered with trees and vegetation.

Bayon

Bayon temple which is located in the middle of the great ancient city of Angkor Thom, the last capital of the Khmer Empire during the reign of King Jayavarman VII. It is a city surrounded by an 8 meters high rampart with 3 km on each side, drawing a perfect square. Bayon, King Jayavarman VII’s State Temple dated 1181, is one of the most mysterious temples in the Angkor region. You will admire its beautifully carved central towers that cover 200 huge stone Buddha faces facing the four cardinal points. Leaving the Bayon, you will visit the terrace of the Elephants.


Baphuon

The Baphuon is a temple at Angkor, Cambodia. It is located in Angkor Thom, northwest of the Bayon. Built in the mid-11th century, it is a three-tiered temple mountain built as the state temple of Udayadityavarman II dedicated to the Hindu God Shiva. It is the archetype of the Baphuon style. The temple adjoins the southern enclosure of the royal palace and measures 120 metres east-west by 100 metres north-south at its base and stands 34 meters tall without its tower.

Phimeanakas

The temple was the focal point of Suryavarman I's capital. The buildings there from his reign are enclosed by a wall 600 by 250 m, with five gopuram, and include the Southern and Northern Khleangs.
The tower must originally have been crowned with a golden pinnacle, as Zhou Daguan described it in his report. According to legend, the king spent the first watch of every night with a woman thought to represent a Nāga in the tower, during that time, not even the queen was permitted to intrude. Only in the second watch the king returned to his palace with the queen. If the naga who was the supreme land owner of Khmer land did not show up for a night, the king's day would be numbered, if the king did not show up, calamity would strike his land.

Angkor Wat

Angkor Wat is a temple complex in Cambodia and the largest religious monument in the world, with the site measuring 162.6 hectares (1,626,000 sq meters). It was originally constructed as a Hindu temple for the Khmer Empire, gradually transforming into a Buddhist temple toward the end of the 12th century. It was built by the Khmer King Suryavarman II in the early 12th century in Yaśodharapura (Khmer: យសោធរបុរៈ, present-day Angkor), the capital of the Khmer Empire, as his state temple and eventual mausoleum. Breaking from the Shaiva tradition of previous kings, Angkor Wat was instead dedicated to Vishnu. As the best-preserved temple at the site, it is the only one to have remained a significant religious center since its foundation. The temple is at the top of the high classical style of Khmer architecture. It has become a symbol of Cambodia, appearing on its national flag

- Travelers room


Day 2 - Visit of the temples in the grand circuit, Preah Khan - Neak Pean ...

 Siem Reap 

Today, you will continue exploring the ancient capital of the Khmer Empire, which ruled over a very large area including present-day Cambodia, Thailand, Laos and a large part of Vietnam in the 13th century. In the morning, English guide and driver will pick you up at your hotel and take you to visit the temples of the grand circuit. Your starting point is the Preah Khan temple. The temple of Preah Khan also called 'sacred sword', was in other times a monastery of monks and a Buddhist university. You can admire the magnificent sculptures that decorate the ancient walls of the temple. Then you will continue your visit to the Neak Pean Temple also called Coiled Naga. Built in the 12th century, Neak Pean has a sanctuary located in the middle of an artificial basin. The lake was made to be a replica of the sacred lake of Anavatapta, located in the Tibetan Himalayas. You will pass along the Ta Som (a temple covered by vegetation), before reaching the East Mebon (an ancient city, of which there remains only the main temple, surrounded by a water reservoir) and you will continue to Pre Rup temple, dated 10th century. As you continue your visit, you will explore the Banteay Kdei temple on the door of which you will discover 4 giant stone Buddha faces. The “architectural” journey will end with the visit of Srah Srang (a swimming pool built in the 10th century). Return to Siem Reap late afternoon

Preah Khan

Preah Khan is a temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built in the 12th century for King Jayavarman VII to honor his father. It is located northeast of Angkor Thom and just west of the Jayatataka baray, with which it was associated. It was the centre of a substantial organisation, with almost 100,000 officials and servants. The temple is flat in design, with a basic plan of successive rectangular galleries around a Buddhist sanctuary complicated by Hindu satellite temples and numerous later additions. Like the nearby Ta Prohm, Preah Khan has been left largely un-restored, with numerous trees and other vegetation growing among the ruins.

Neak Pean

Neak Pean (or Neak Poan) (Khmer: ប្រាសាទនាគព័ន្ធ) ("The entwined serpents") at Angkor, Cambodia is an artificial island with a Buddhist temple on a circular island in Preah Khan Baray built during the reign of King Jayavarman VII. It is the "Mebon" of the Preah Khan Baray (the "Jayatataka" of the inscription).

Ta Som

Ta Som is a small temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built at the end of the 12th century for King Jayavarman VII. It is located north east of Angkor Thom and just east of Neak Pean. The King dedicated the temple to his father Dharanindravarman II (Paramanishkalapada) who was King of the Khmer Empire from 1150 to 1160. The temple consists of a single shrine located on one level and surrounded by enclosure laterite walls. Like the nearby Preah Khan and Ta Prohm the temple was left largely un-restored, with numerous trees and other vegetation growing among the ruins. In 1998, the World Monuments Fund (WMF) added the temple to their restoration program and began work to stabilise the structure to make it safer for visitors.

East Mebon

The East Mebon is a 10th Century temple at Angkor, Cambodia. Built during the reign of King Rajendravarman, it stands on what was an artificial island at the center of the now dry East Baray reservoir.
The East Mebon was dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva and honors the parents of the king. Its location reflects Khmer architects’ concern with orientation and cardinal directions. The temple was built on a north-south axis with Rajendravarman’s state temple, Pre Rup, located about 1,200 meters to the south just outside the baray. The East Mebon also lies on an east-west axis with the palace temple Phimeanakas, another creation of Rajendravarman’s reign, located about 6,800 meters due west.

Pre Rup

Pre Rup is a temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built as the state temple of Khmer king Rajendravarman and dedicated in 961 or early 962. It is a temple mountain of combined brick, laterite and sandstone construction.
The temple’s name is a comparatively modern one meaning "turn the body". This reflects the common belief among Cambodians that funerals were conducted at the temple, with the ashes of the body being ritually rotated in different directions as the service progressed.

Banteay Kdei

Banteay Kdei (Prasat Banteay Kdei), meaning "A Citadel of Chambers", also known as "Citadel of Monks' cells", is a Buddhist temple in Angkor, Cambodia. It is located southeast of Ta Prohm and east of Angkor Thom. Built in the mid-12th to early 13th centuries AD during the reign of Jayavarman VII (who was posthumously given the title "Maha paramasangata pada"), it is in the Bayon architectural style, similar in plan to Ta Prohm and Preah Khan, but less complex and smaller.

Srah Srang

Srah Srang measures 700 by 350 m and is still partially flooded. As other barays, maybe there was a temple standing on an artificial island in the middle of it, as suggested by finding of a basement. The landing-stage, opposite the entrance to Banteay Kdei, is a popular site for viewing the sunrise. It is cruciform, flanked by nāga balaustrades which end with the upright head of a serpent, mounted by a garuda with its wings unfurled. The steps that lead down to the water are flanked by two guardian lions.


- Travelers room